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TOPIC: How To: Build your own Putter Rack

How To: Build your own Putter Rack 8 years 2 months ago #9383

  • PutterAddict
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I am a ADDICT when it comes to putters and I got sick of my putters that were in my little den caddy bag so I decided to build a putter rack for my man cave. I hope you all enjoy this. It was a long work in progress and I truly enjoyed it.

What you will need: TOOLS

- jigsaw
- sander (belt or electric is fine)
- sand paper (120, 220 and 320 grit or whatever is available to you but you need to move up the scale to get that smooth finish)
- brad nail gun (wood is 1.2 inch thick, screws could stretch the wood)
- 1" brad nails
- square or triangle (for measuring and squaring up wood prior to cutting)
- 1” Forestener bit (notches for putters)
- Wood stain (polyurethane can be added to add a shine to it, you can buy it with poly in the stain, DONT. never comes out evenly. Buy it separately)
- Wood Glue


Design

What do you want your rack to look like? Take your wood and draw it out first on the wood before cutting. You will sand off all pencil marks later once it is pieced together before staining. The rack shown here is a floor rack that holds 15 putters. You will also want to decide on how many you want to fit and how close you want them. I wanted a close knit rack so my cut outs have a 1/2 inch space between each. Once you decide on the dimensions and style, you need to make a very thorough list on what wood you will need.

For this setup, this is what you will need for parts:

- 3 - 4' by 6" wide, 1/2" thick (2 for the sides and 1 for the top piece)
- 3 - 2' by 3 1/2" wide, 1/2" thick (2 for the bottom holder and 1 to cut a piece off for the cut outs for putters)
- 1 - 2' by 6" wide, 1/4" thick (platform to rest putters on)
- 1 piece of carpet (thin) from hardware store (this is to put down on the platform to prevent scratches on the bottoms of the putters)


Lumber Shopping

Before you go to the hardware/lumberyard, decide what you will want it to look like. Decide on a stain, then head out. Remember, that different woods will stain differently. If you haven’t done much staining before, you’ll probably want to make a test board and test how it will come out before you start buying the wood. The samples they show when picking out the stains are not really close.

A test board is used to determine how many coats of stain you want to apply to your project. Take a piece of scrap wood that you are using in your rack and stain the board and let it dry. Tape off a section, leave that section alone, then apply a second coat to the rest of the board. When it’s dry, tape off another 4” section and apply a third coat to the last section of the board. When that’s dry, you will be able to compare what 1, 2, and 3 coats of stain look like.

If you pick a common wood like oak, cherry, or maple, you will probably have the choice of buying S4 or finished lumber (this wood that is already surfaced and squared up pretty well) or buying rough cut lumber (which is…rough, pretty rough and needs to be planed and sanded a lot). Finished lumber is more expensive and if you have the money, it is worth the investment and time it will save you. I used s4 lumber in this build.




The Build

STEP 1
Once you have the wood, cut all the pieces to size on a table saw or compound miter saw (which I used). Measure and mark all the cuts using your square or triangle and double check your measurements. It is really important that all of your horizontal pieces are exactly the same length so that the rack fits together without any gaps.

STEP 2 (use 1 - 2' by 3 1/2" wide, 1/2" thick and cut to 2" wide)
After all the pieces are cut to size, I drill the grip separator. For this, use the 1” Forestener bit spaced 1/2” apart or if you want more space, do 1", if you have mallets, do 2". To avoid chipping the bottom of the wood when drilling, put another board underneath your work piece to support it. Also, go slow when starting the hole, this will prevent chipping on the top but you will sand it later.

STEP 3 (use 3 - 4' by 6" wide, 1/2" thick, 2 for the sides and 1 for the top)
Next, cut out the shapes of the sides and header with a jigsaw. Layout, draw and design on the board your design for the side pieces and top piece before any cutting is done. Cut 1 of the sides and after you cut it out, you can trace the design to the other piece of wood. When cutting leave yourself a little extra so you can sand and round the edges – you can clean it up with the sander later. Save your scraps, you will need a couple of small pieces to use on the footer where the putter heads go to secure the platform.

STEP 4
With the pieces cut, it is time to sand. Working through your progression of sandpaper grits, from 120-220-320 (or whatever you prefer/have access to), sand the edges of the sides and header so that they are smooth and rounded off a little. You don't want sharp edges. Also sand the sides, progressively working up the scale as well to get that super smooth finish. (got an ipod, listen to it and go to town, you can be here for a bit to get the right finished product). With the putter spacer piece, you can also round the edges of the gaps, I did this so I did not accidentally nic any of my grips placing them in and out of the rack.

STEP 5
Next, I move back to the drill press and, with the sides still clamped together, I drill the holes where the grip separator and floor will be screwed in. I like to keep the pieces clamped together here so that the holes are perfectly lined up. After I drill the holes through both pieces, I switch drill bits and counter bore holes that the screw caps will sit in. 2/8” or 3/8” deep is perfect.

STEP 6
With the pieces finished being sanded, it is time to put it together. Use your brad nailer to piece together the rack. Before you nail each piece, make sure to put a bead of wood glue down the seam to ensure a tight fit. The scraps from the sides, you will need 3 to 4 small 3" long, 1" wide pieces. Nail these about 1/2 way down the front bottom board on the inside. This will allow you to rest the platform to rest your putters on. The platform will not need to be nailed in. Place the board in the bottom section and apply a little pressure at an angle and the board will wedge in. Due to the thickness of this piece, it is hard to nail in, but wedging it will be just fine and it should not move.

STEP 7
Next is the fun step, staining. For this rack, I’m using Varathane Mahogany stain. With a foam brush, apply to the surface and then wipe off the excess. If you are not comfortable or skilled at this process, just do one side at a time and let dry first before you start on the other side. You do not want to have fingerprints in your finish. When you are done staining, you can use some type of polyurethane to protect the finish, I prefer the flat look so mine is does not have a polyurethane. But if you want to, it is easy, wipe on and wipe off. Make sure you put it on evenly, too much in one area, it will be too shiny.

STEP 8
The final step is to attach the carpet to the platform. Cut a piece of carpet to match the size of your platform piece, leaving a bit of extra width so that the toe stop has some carpet on it, too. I use spray adhesive to attach it, just make sure you lay down some newspaper underneath where you are spraying.


Finished Product:


Check out my newest review!
Lamkin Sink Putter Grip - golfballed.com/categories/accessory-revi...k-putter-grip-review
Instagram and Twitter - Putting2theMax
Last Edit: 8 years 2 months ago by PutterAddict.
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Re: How To: Build your own Putter Rack 8 years 2 months ago #9387

Nice Job !!!!
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Re: How To: Build your own Putter Rack 8 years 2 months ago #9392

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Thanks!
Check out my newest review!
Lamkin Sink Putter Grip - golfballed.com/categories/accessory-revi...k-putter-grip-review
Instagram and Twitter - Putting2theMax
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PutterAddict wrote:
Thanks!

Now get to work on the really special one ! ;)
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Re: How To: Build your own Putter Rack 8 years 2 months ago #9403

  • jmcelroy
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Sounds good, will check out the pix when I'm not on tapatalk.
Driver: Nike Vapor Speed
Woods: Nike Vapor Speed 3w
Hybrid: Nike Vapor speed 3h
Irons: Nike Vapor Pro Combo 4-A
Wedges: Cleveland 588 RTX Forged (54/58)
Putter: Odyssey Teron
Golf Ball: Callaway Hex Hot Pro
Bag: SunMountain C-130
Launch Monitor: Flightscope Xi Tour
Last Edit: 8 years 2 months ago by jmcelroy.
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Man that is sick! Great build and very easy to follow steps. Makes a lot of sense. If I can get around to getting my man cave started this is absolutely phase 2 of that!

Thanks for sharing man. Great write up.
Driver: Titleist 913D2 10.5* with Stiff Aldila RIP 60g
2 Hybrid: Taylormade RBZ Stage 2 tour 16.5*
Irons: TaylorMade Tour Preferred CB 3/4i, MC 5/6i, MB 7-9i
Wedges: SCOR 44*, 48*, 56*, & 61*
Putter: 35" Scotty Cameron Select Newport 2.6

GB giveaways winner of: Srixon Q Stars, Nike RZN

Tester...
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